The Meaning of Christmas

     Christmas is a man-made holiday (or holy day) which has both religious and commercial meaning. The season often comes with good food, cheery colors, happy tunes, and pleasant greetings of “Merry Christmas.” Most people I know seem joyful during the holiday season, in spite of the commercialism or occasional protester (who ridicules anything related to Christianity).

     Christmas—for the Christian—is a celebration of the birth of Jesus, the Savior, into a needy world (Luke 1:26-38). For me, the birth of Jesus evokes wonderful emotions. This is because I see His birth as the beginning of something larger, which included His whole life, death, burial, resurrection, and ascension into heaven. If we look only at the birth of Christ, we miss the larger theological message of the Gospels. We should keep in mind that only two chapters mention the birth of Christ, whereas thirty eight chapters mention His death.

     Christmas is about the gift of God to a fallen world. Nearly 2000 years ago, God the Son added true humanity to Himself (hypostatic union; John 1:1, 14), was supernaturally conceived in the virgin Mary (parthenogenesis; see Luke 1:26-38), the mother of His humanity (christotokos – bearer of Christ), and was born a son of Abraham, in the line David (Matt. 1:1). Jesus grew in wisdom (Luke 2:40, 52), and lived a sinless and righteous life before God and man (2 Cor. 5:21; 1 John 3:5).

     Christmas is about love and sacrifice. On April 3, A.D. 33, Jesus willingly laid down His life and died a substitutionary atoning death on a cross (Mark 10:45; John 3:16; 10:11, 17-18). He died a death He did not deserve, “the just for the unjust, so that He might bring us to God” (1 Pet. 3:18). Jesus’ death forever satisfied every righteous demand God had toward our sin (Rom. 3:24-25; Heb. 10:10-14; 1 John 2:2; 4:10), and is the basis for forgiveness and reconciliation to God (Rom. 5:1-2; 2 Cor. 5:21; Eph. 1:7; Col. 1:13-14; 20-22). To those who believe the gospel (1 Cor. 15:3-4), God freely offers the gift of eternal life and the imputation of His righteousness (John 3:16; 10:28; Rom. 5:17; Eph. 2:8-9; 2 Cor. 5:21; Phil. 3:9; 1 Pet. 3:18).

     Christmas is about a future hope. After His crucifixion, Jesus was buried and resurrected bodily on the third day (Matt. 20:18-19; Acts 10:39-41; 1 Cor. 15:3-4), never to die again (Rom. 5:9), ascending to heaven (Acts 1:9-10), with a promise of a physical return for His own (John 14:1-3; Acts 1:11; 1 Thess. 4:13-18; Tit. 2:13). Following His return, the King of kings and Lord of lords will reign in righteousness (Rev. 19:11-16; 20:1-6), and afterward, will create a “new heavens and a new earth, in which righteousness dwells” (2 Pet. 3:13; cf. Rev. 21:1).

     Christmas is about all that is marvelous in Christ, from birth onward, who provides blessing and hope to those who cast themselves upon Him. May we all find joy in the Savior, who loved us and gave Himself for us. Amen

Steven R. Cook, M. Div.

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About Steven R. Cook, M.Div.

Steven is a Christian educator. His webpages communicate evangelical Christian doctrines and topics. Steven earned a Master of Divinity degree in 2006 and pursued doctoral work in Expository Preaching and Systematic Theology. His articles are theological, devotional, and promote a biblical worldview. Studies in the original languages of Scripture, ancient history, and systematic theology have been the foundation for Steven’s teaching and writing ministry. He has written several Christian books, dozens of articles on Christian theology, and recorded more than three hundred hours of audio and video sermons. Steven worked in jail ministry for over twelve years, taught in Bible churches, and currently leads a Bible study each week at his home in Arlington, Texas.
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3 Responses to The Meaning of Christmas

  1. John J Flanagan says:

    Yes indeed. You speak correctly. The real meaning of the birth of Jesus, His death and Resurrection, Man’s need for salvation, these things should be reflected upon, and we need to let the world keep Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny.

  2. Pingback: Who were the Magi? | Thinking on Scripture

  3. Pingback: When was Jesus Born? | Thinking on Scripture

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